fbpx
Skip to content

New Riders

New Riders

Would you drive with a person who did not have a driver’s license?

The answer most people would give is no, yet a disturbingly large number of motorcycle riders feel it is OK to ride without a motorcycle license.

Training and Licensing for New Riders

If you want to ride a two- or three-wheel motorcycle, you are required by Florida law to have a motorcycle endorsement on your driver license or hold a ‘Motorcycle Only’ license to operate on public roadways. 

Getting a motorcycle endorsement is required in Florida, but it is also the first step to becoming a safe rider. Just having a driver’s license does not mean a rider understands the different handling features of a motorcycle. Proper training and education will expose you to critical skills needed to enjoy a safe and exciting ride!

New motorcyclists must take and pass the Basic RiderCourse (BRC) or Basic RiderCourse updated (BRCu) through a FRTP authorized Sponsor before they can have the motorcycle endorsement added to their license, per section 322.12(5)(a), Florida Statutes.

The BRC provides basic entry-level skills for a new rider. BRC RiderCoaches, coach riders to develop the physical skills of basic control that include straight line riding, stopping, turning/shifting, and then move on to more advanced skills like stopping quickly, cornering, and swerving. Insurance, motorcycle, helmet and student handbook are provided for the course.

The BRCu updated course includes more realistic traffic scenarios as students learn:

Basic physical skills

Mental strategies

Manipulation of basic controls

Rider perception & strategies

Turning & cornering maneuvers

Handling emergencies

Three-Wheels

Riders who plan to ride a three-wheel motorcycle or “trike” can opt to take a 3-wheel Basic RiderCourse (3WBRC) instead of the BRC or BRCu. Taking the 3WBRC will limit the rider to only operating a motorcycle with more than two wheels on Florida roadways.

Riders who initially obtain their endorsement through a 3WBRC will have an “S” Restriction reflected on the license, meaning they are only licensed to operate 3-wheel motorcycles and should not operate a 2-wheel motorcycles.   

Similarly, The Sidecar/Trike Education Program (S/TEP) is a course that can be taken by the unendorsed rider for endorsement but will limit the rider to only operating a motorcycle with more than two wheels or attached sidecar (“S” Restriction will also be reflected on the license if the “Motorcycle Also” endorsement is not currently applied).

scooters and Mopeds

Two- and three-wheel vehicles with an engine displacement under 50cc need a driver license to operate on Florida’s roadways. A motorcycle endorsement is not required for these vehicle types. However, scooter and moped riders should still take safe riding seriously. Many scooter riders can benefit from taking the BRC, which prepares riders for strategies and skills necessary to interact with other drivers on public streets.

The BRC curriculum addresses curves, intersections, and other road hazards you will encounter while riding a scooter or moped. Learning and practicing these techniques will make your ride more enjoyable.

RIDER LICENSING

Being properly licensed and endorsed is required by law and is one of the first steps to becoming a safe rider. Just having a driver’s license does not mean you are legal to ride a motorcycle and it does not mean the individual understands the different handling features of a motorcycle. Florida requires all two and three-wheeled motor vehicle operators to obtain a license and endorsement to operate the vehicles.

After July 1, 2008 new motorcyclists, no matter their age, must take and pass the Basic RiderCourse (or equivalent) through the Florida Rider Training Program before they can have the motorcycle endorsement added to their license.

LAWS, LICENSING, & REGISTRATIONS

In the state of Florida, motorcycles are not required to be insured in order to purchase a tag.  However, if a motorcycle is involved in a crash where the owner is cited for a moving violation and there is an indication of an injury to themselves or others, or at least $500 in damages, the owner’s driving privilege and registration could be suspended unless he/she can provide proof of full liability insurance (10/20/10) on the date of the crash. If proof of insurance can’t be provided, the at fault party will be required to purchase liability insurance in the form of an SR-22 insurance certificate. This certificate of insurance will need to be maintained for a period of three years from the original suspension date.